Help me understand- Dream or not

DaveDavid

New member
I posted this on another forum and wanted to try here.

I'm not sure where to begin or how to explain. I have dreams when fully awake of places or things that I think I have experienced but never really have. It only last a few minutes when I'm fully awake. I see it and I completely forget what it was about when it's over, but I know it happened. When I have the dream, in the moment it seems real of a place I have been too. It's frightening and it makes me feel very uncomfortable. I don't like the feeling at all.

Happens once or twice a month and anytime during the day. Started a few years ago. Please help me understand.
 

dreammerchant

Active member
Hi DaveDavid,

Without more information, it's going to be challenging to determine what's going on. Here are some questions for you to try and understand what you're experiencing:

1. Have you noticed any patterns related to the time of day, your emotional state, or activities you are engaged in before they happen?

2. Can you recall specific details from your visions, such as landscapes, objects, people, or animals? Even though the memory might fade, noting any recurring themes or symbols can be revealing.

3. During these visions, do you experience any particular physical sensations, such as tingling, warmth, pressure, or feeling pulled in a direction?

4. What emotions arise during and after these visions? Are there specific feelings consistently evoked by these experiences in addition to fear?

5. Are there any known spiritual practices or beliefs in your family history that might resonate with these experiences? Sometimes, cultural or ancestral backgrounds can play a role.

6. Have these visions started after a significant life event, stress, or change in your lifestyle or health?

7. How do these visions align or conflict with your spiritual or religious beliefs? Exploring this might help in framing these experiences within a broader spiritual context.

8. How are these visions affecting your day-to-day life? Are they impacting your ability to function or your relationships with others?

9. Are you seeking guidance or messages within these visions? What are you most hoping to understand or resolve through them?

10. Have you had any intuitive feelings or insights that come to you during or after these visions, even if they seem unrelated or illogical?

11. What is your usual sleep schedule? How many hours of sleep do you get each night, and do you find it difficult to fall or stay asleep?

12. Do these visions occur close to the time you are falling asleep, waking up, or at any specific time during the day or night?

13. How would you rate the quality of your sleep regularly? Do you often feel rested upon waking, or do you experience fatigue throughout the day?

14. Are you currently taking any medications, especially those that affect the central nervous system, such as antidepressants, anti-anxiety medication, or sleep aids? Do you use substances like caffeine, alcohol, or recreational drugs, which might affect your sleep or neurological state?

15. Do you have any known health conditions, particularly neurological disorders or sleep disorders like narcolepsy, sleep apnea, or restless leg syndrome?

16. What is your current stress level, and do you have any ongoing mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, or significant life stressors?

17. Is there any family history of neurological or sleep-related disorders?

18. How do you typically react to these visions? Have you developed any coping mechanisms to help you manage your feelings during or after the episodes?

19. How do these experiences affect your daily life, including work, relationships, and personal activities?

20. Have you previously consulted any health professionals about these experiences? If so, what was discussed or concluded?

21. If you had any dreams related to this issue, sharing them may be revealing.
 
The Dream Merchant has given you very good advice. As a therapist I would ask you to consider disassociation, which occurs when parts of past trauma intrude on our daily life.
It would be very helpful for you to process these events with a therapist. It may not be disassociation, but in any case, since you find the events unpleasant, bringing them completely to consciousness and integrating them could help them to ease and cease.
 

DammitDog

New member
There was a point I'd have thought that sounded nuts. A few years ago though I had a major health issue, even checking out briefly. Reality was fuzzy on the front side as my body was shutting down. On the back side, everything in my body was beginning to function again and learning the new normal. I had frequent experiences in that period where in the course of my day I'd find myself entirely somewhere else having a different experience from where I physically was. I'd get a little light headed and whole stories would play out around me - like full plot lines. That quickly, I'd snap back to reality and realize I'm at work or whatever and no one around me even noticed I'd journeyed elsewhere and had this other experience as they stood talking to me. These were different than the things I dream at night. They were in places I'd never seen or heard of before and it felt very real, as if I'd been on the ground experiencing it first hand. It was really odd. As my body healed, it happened less often. I seldom had recall of the vision (or whatever you want to call it) for long after snapping back to reality. If/when I am somewhere and get the vibe I've been there in a dream but don't recall details, I just take that as a sign to pay attention and be cautious. Just to be safe, a general physical would be a good place to start to make sure you don't have any medical issues causing it. I don't have an explanation for it myself except to say I experienced it around a major health issue and/or maybe the veil was thin as a result my brush with death.
 
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From a Jungian perspective, we can say that the unconscious is making itself known. The important thing is to meditate this with consciousness. The trauma of your brush with death may have precipitated this. I still think therapy is a good idea, it wouldn't necessarily be long term. But, esp. with a Jungian therapist who understands these things. My best, Lyn
 
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